Dr. Anthony O. Parker

The education that we provide is relevant.  What we teach fits. The curriculum taught at Albany Technical College addresses the workforce skill sets needed by employers in Southwest Georgia. Periodic research is conducted by the college to determine what skill sets need to be adapted, added, or deleted.  Each program is formally evaluated every three to five years.  Albany Tech’s curriculum has a 70 percent overlap with Georgia’s strategic workforce initiatives.

The quality of instruction provided by Albany Tech exceeds expectations. The learning outcomes for each program are validated by employers through PROBE process.  Instruction is focused on the acquisition of those outcomes. Teaching pedagogy is evaluated so that instruction that delivers good results will be repeated. Instruction that achieves marginal results is modified to improve student learning.  The quality of instruction can also be inferred through program accreditation and evaluation by outside groups. Students also evaluate instruction to provide feedback that will result in improved student outcomes.  The learning environment at Albany Tech approximates the workforce.  Instructional equipment is refreshed every three years and labs are refreshed every five years.

We take pride in our faculty’s credentials. Each faculty member is a subject matter expert. Most have worked for over a decade in the areas that they teach. Faculty engage in professional development designed to reflect the dynamic changes to the skill sets requested by employers. 

Albany Technical College teaches and evaluates work ethics. Work ethics are taught in each class of ATC’s academic programs.  Students earn grades based on performance related to attendance and timeliness of submission of assignments, etc. Such grades are reported on each student’s transcript.  We encourage employers to evaluate graduates’ demonstration of good work ethics. ATC’s graduates are academically, ethically and technically prepared for the workforce.

We offer a warranty of each graduate’s workforce skills. Employers or graduates may petition the college for an opportunity to be reeducated in areas of deficiency. Accommodations will be made if it is determined that a graduate was substantially underprepared for work by our college.

The overwhelming number of Albany Tech’s graduates stay local. Approximately 80 percent of Albany Technical College’s students reside in Dougherty or contiguous counties. Almost all are commutator students. During the past five years, we’ve determined that 77 percent of Albany Technical College’s graduates work within 25 miles of the Albany city limits. They help to address the skills gap in SW Georgia. They purchase homes and buy durable goods. They contribute to churches and local charities. Their employment provides the fuel for the SW Georgia economic development engine.