Albany Tech traces its roots back to 1961 when it was established as the Monroe Area Vocational-Technical School enrolling 175 students. Shortly thereafter, the Albany Area Vocational-Technical School was built, and in 1972 the two schools were merged in the current location.

In July 1988, the Georgia Department of Technical and Adult Education (DTAE), now A Unit of the Technical College System of Georgia, was formed and the newly named Albany Technical Institute came under its direction. Albany Tech was charged with providing technical education opportunities to the residents, businesses and industries within a seven-county service delivery area. These counties include Baker, Calhoun, Clay, Dougherty, Lee, Randolph and Terrell.

With the passage of House Bill 1187, the Georgia Legislature approved the changing of DTAE technical institutes' names to "college," providing they offered associate degrees. Meeting the criterion, Albany Technical Institute became Albany Technical College with a grand ceremony on July 6, 2000.

Bill Clinton Visits Albany Tech
Bill Clinton visits Albany Technical Institute

Albany Tech has adult learning centers in all seven of its service delivery counties. Today, more than 3,000 full-time students are enrolled in credit programs per quarter. Another 2,500 are enrolled part-time and in seminars, continuing education courses, teleconferences and customized business training.

Albany Technical College's Mission

Albany Technical College, a unit of the Technical College System of Georgia, located in southwest Georgia, prepares individuals to meet dynamic and evolving workforce needs, utilizing industry-driven teaching and learning approaches including traditional, online, and customized business solutions. The College awards Technical Certificates of Credit, Diplomas and Associate degrees to students who meet program completion criteria. Albany Technical College is a public two-year institution committed to providing higher education and life-long learning opportunities that promote self-sufficiency, economic development, and community growth and sustainability.

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Southwest Georgia Flooding
Flooding of Albany Technical College